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Contents:
  1. Soviet war memorials in Eastern Europe continue to strain relations with Russia
  2. The Great War and Memory in Central and South-Eastern Europe
  3. Russia is more dangerous than Isis, says Polish foreign minister
  4. Legacies of Violence: Eastern Europe’s First World War

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Soviet war memorials in Eastern Europe continue to strain relations with Russia

Review our privacy policy for more details. Andes Central America. Seven Opportunities for the UN in Eastern Europe. Getting Aid to Separatist-held Ukraine. CrisisWatch Eastern Europe August View latest updates. Deteriorated Situations none. Improved Situations none. The final agreements at Potsdam concerned:. While the Potsdam declaration did not specifically mention the newly developed atomic bomb, Truman had mentioned a new powerful weapon to Stalin during the conference.

The Great War and Memory in Central and South-Eastern Europe

The timing of the bombings, on August 6 and 9 suggest that Truman preferred to keep the Soviet Union out of the Pacific War and out of post-war dealings with Japan. The Soviets annexed their first territories in eastern Poland on September 17, , under the terms of the Non-Aggression Pact made with Nazi Germany.

WW2 Battle Scene - 1942 Eastern Europe

Soon after, the Red Army went to war with Finland in order to secure a buffer zone of protection for Leningrad St. When the war was over, Finland ceded the territories demanded by the Soviets plus Karelia. In addition to the Republics, several countries in Eastern Europe operated as Soviet satellite states. These countries were not officially part of the USSR, but their governments were loyal Stalinists, and therefore looked to and aligned themselves with the Soviet Union politically and militarily via the Warsaw Pact.

Russia is more dangerous than Isis, says Polish foreign minister

After the Potsdam conference, Germany was divided into four occupied zones: Great Britain in the northwest, France in the southwest, the United States in the south and the Soviet Union in the east. Berlin, the capital city situated in Soviet territory, was also divided into four occupied zones.

Tito is made president of Yugoslavia for life

Germany also lost territory east of the Oder and Neisse rivers, which fell under Polish control. In many ways that set the stage for the autocracies of the s and further bloodshed.


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The Polish-Soviet war lasted until There was also fighting between Poles and Ukrainians and Poles and Lithuanians, and pogroms perpetrated against Jews. The Greek-Turkish war of led to terrible massacres, and a forced exchange of populations that uprooted 1.

The date also meant something entirely different for many easterners. For Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, Estonians, Latvians and Lithuanians, represented the advent of statehood, or the restoration of nationhood. Ukrainians also experienced this, if fleetingly. Poland reappeared on the map after years of having been carved up by empires.

Legacies of Violence: Eastern Europe’s First World War

For Hungarians, the end of the war is synonymous with the treaty of Trianon by which the country lost two-thirds of its territory and more than half of its population. Why does remembering this matter particularly now? For one thing, it seems awkward to commemorate as if Europe were still cut in two, as it was during the cold war — with some collective memories pushed aside, frozen behind the iron curtain, while others are more easily spoken of and acknowledged.

To be sure, political leaders can manipulate history.